Terminology

A

B

BCAA’s (Branch Chain Amino Acids)
Leucine, Valine, and Isoleucine are called “branch chain” aminos due to their molecular structure, and are important essential amino acids well known for their anticatabolic (muscle-saving) benefits. They are called BCAA’s because they structurally branch off another chain of atoms instead of forming a line. Studies have shown that BCAA’s have a positive impact on skeletal muscle growth, enhance fat loss, help to stimulate protein synthesis and inhibit its breakdown.

C

Carbohydrate
There are two basic forms of carbohydrates: Simple & Complex. Simple carbs are usually devoid of fiber and include such foods as refined sugars, fruit juices, and apple sauce. The problem with simple carbs is that they promote a large insulin surge, which can lead to hypoglycemia. Complex carbs are absorbed more slowly, so they don’t cause as great an insulin surge as the simple type. Primary macronutrient source of energy in the body; burned as glucose and stored in muscle as glycogen (excess stored as fat) and includes all sugars (1 gram yields 4 calories).

D

E

F

Failure
The point in an exercise at which you have fully fatigued your working muscles and can no longer complete an additional rep.

Fats
Macronutrient that is a source for long term energy and energy storage (as adipose tissue); necessary for absorption and transport of fat-soluble vitamins and constituant of hormones and cell membranes (1 gram=9 calories).

G

H

HIIT
This is an acronym for High Intensity Interval Training. This explosive training includes periods of short, intense exercise followed by a short rest period. It’s been shown that HIIT is extremely effective for increasing metabolism and for burning fat.

I

J

K

L

M

MTC
Stands for Mountain Climbers

N

O

P

Protein
Primary macronutrient for growth and maintenance of our body’s structural parts (including muscle). Cannot be stored, so must be replenished through diet. (1 gram=4 calories).

Q

R

Rep
The completion of a single exercise or movement through a full range of motion.

S

Set
A group of reps performed consecutively. For example, if you complete an exercise one time for nine reps, that counts as one set of nine.

Superset
Two exercises that are performed back-to-back with little to no rest in between the two sets.

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

Free Consult